Falmouth, Cape students compete in national science challenges

Teams from Cape Elizabeth and Falmouth high schools recently participated in national science competitions in Washington, D.C.

Cape Elizabeth High School

Cape Elizabeth High School was among 69 high schools from the United States that competed recently in the U.S. Department of Energy’s 22nd annual National Science Bowl.

The team from Cape Elizabeth participated in a variety of activities, including hands-on science experiments. Middle school teams participated in a Lithium-Ion Battery-Powered Model Car Race.

Cape Elizabeth’s team qualified for the National Science Bowl after participating in a regional tournament in which teams of four to five students were tested using a fast-paced Jeopardy-style format on a range of science-related topics including biology, chemistry, Earth science, physics, astronomy and math.

The National Science Bowl was held April 26-30.

U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu judged the high school championship round, led a question-and-answer session with students, and presented awards.

Falmouth High School

The Paper Planes Team at Falmouth High School recently participated in the Real World Design Challenge.

Each year in the competition, student teams are asked to address a challenge that confronts our nation’s leading industries. Students use professional engineering software to develop solutions and develop presentations to demonstrate the value of their solutions.

The Real World Design Challenge emphasizes partnerships among industry, government, academia, and the non-profit sector.

Congratulations to the Falmouth team for its excellent presentation!

Real World Design Challenge team members from Falmouth High School pose for a picture.

From left, team adviser John Kraljic, Muna El-Taha, Weston Scott, Patrick Thornton, Kevin Conroy, Ian Vaughn, Shreyas Joshi, Eric Sanderson and Rich Grich, director of the Maine Aerospace Alliance.

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