Recording & Materials from Presentation About ESSA & Report Cards

The Maine Department of Education held a presentation on Monday, December 10 about the details of Maine’s Model of School Support under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) which includes the release of the new, user-friendly, public Report Cards in early January. Below is a link to a recording of the session and links to the PowerPoint Presentation, in addition to all of the handouts from the presentation.

Further questions about Maine’s ESSA Plan, Maine’s Model of School Support, and the Report Cards should be directed to Acting Director of Learning Systems, Janette Kirk Janette.Kirk@maine.gov or ESEA Federal Programs & School Turnaround Director Chelsey Fortin-Trimble Chelsey.A.Fortin@maine.gov.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Maine DOE to Host Presentation About ESSA & School Report Cards

The School Report Cards are scheduled to be released to the public at the end of December.

WHAT:
The Maine Department of Education (DOE) would like to invite the media to attend a presentation about the details of Maine’s Model of School Support under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) which includes the release of the new, user-friendly, public Report Cards later this month.

WHEN:
Monday, December 10, 2018 from 9:00am – 12:00pm

WHERE:
Cross Office Building, 111 Sewell Street, Augusta, Maine, Room 500
Live Stream Link: https://zoom.us/j/867836618 (this will be recorded)

AGENDA:

  • Opening comments from Commissioner Robert G. Hasson Jr.
  • Overview of Maine’s Model of School Support (1 hour)
    • Overview of Indicators
    • Overview of School Support
    • Questions & Answer session
  • Overview of Maine’s Report Cards*  (1 hour)
    • New format for report card
    • Walk through of the Report Cards
    • Questions & Answer session

*For the 12/10/18 presentations, the Report Cards will be displayed with sample data. The public Report Cards, with school data for each public school in Maine, will not be released until the end of December.

For further information please contact Maine DOE Director of Communications, Rachel Paling at rachel.paling@maine.gov.

Using Assessment to Strengthen Instruction in English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science, K-8

As part of its 2018-19 Assessment Literacy series, the Maine Department of Education will present full-day workshops to continue supporting educators in examining eMPower ELA and math, and MEA science assessment data, connecting that data with locally generated assessment information, and identifying high impact instructional strategies that foster student engagement and achievement of learning standards.

State level assessment provides school systems with a useful lens through which educators can evaluate the effectiveness of curricula and instructional practices. This information can help educators improve programming to increase the number of students meeting expectations for learning standards in English language arts (ELA), mathematics, and science. The availability of released item data and sample state assessment items, coupled with local level assessment information, enables educators to dig more deeply into what instructional practices are benefiting student learning as well as where adjustments could be made to result in greater positive impact.

Join Maine DOE ELA, Math, and Science specialists as they provide professional learning and resources that:

  • Connect state eMPower and science assessment to instructional practices
  • Delve into the roles cognitive demand and stamina play in instruction and assessment
  • Explore protocols for linking state level data analysis with local level data analysis

Participants will select one of 3 content areas in which to focus their learning during the day: English language arts, mathematics or science.  Schools are strongly encouraged to register teams of 3 so that they will have representation in each of the 3 featured content areas. An alternate option is for educators to come as a team representing one content area (e.g. science teachers from a middle school).  Time will be provided during the day for teams to share their learning across content areas and to collaboratively plan for how to disseminate the day’s content back in their respective schools. Lunch will be provided during each full day session which will run 8:30 am – 3:30 pm. Contact hours will be provided.

Cost is $40 per individual or $100 per 3-person team. Registration requires a credit card.  

Workshop Locations/Registration Links Workshop Dates
Keeley’s Banquet Center, Portland January 15, 2019
Snow Date: February 1, 2019
Jeff’s Catering, Brewer January 24, 2019
Snow Date: January 31, 2019
University of Maine at Presque Isle January 29, 2019
Snow Date: January 30, 2019

For further information, please contact Lee Anne Larsen, Acting Deputy Director of the Office of Learning Systems at 207-624-6628 or leeann.larsen@maine.gov.

What Does Accountability Mean for a School?

Maine’s Model of School Support includes five indicators that focus on key areas of school and student success, adhere to the requirements of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), and directly align to Maine’s Priorities and Goals. Below is the list of indicators of school success:

  1. Chronic Absenteeism (K-12)
  2. Academic Progress (Grades 3-8 Only)
  3. Progress in English Language Proficiency (ELP) for English Learners (K-12)
  4. Academic Achievement (Grades 3-8, High School)
  5. Graduation Rate (High School Only)

Eligible individual student populations (where there are ten or more students of a specific student population) are also measured to identify where targeted support is needed. Student populations include: economically disadvantaged, students with disabilities, English learners, and students who are white, black, Asian, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, Native American, Hispanic, or two or more races.

To determine each school’s performance on the indicators listed above, Maine uses data collected from public schools on an annual basis to provide each school with a performance rating on each applicable indicator.

School Indicators & Performance Levels

The chart below summarizes the indicators used in Maine’s Model of School Support for Maine’s public elementary, middle, and/or high schools. In addition, the criteria surrounding the performance levels for each indicator has been provided.

Indicators Performance Level
Emerging Developing Meeting Excelling
Chronic Absenteeism All eligible student group populations have a chronic absenteeism rate of 10% or higher. At least one eligible student group has a chronic absenteeism rate of less than 10%. All eligible student groups have a chronic absenteeism rate of less than 10%. All eligible student groups have a chronic absenteeism rate of 5% or less.
Academic Progress – English Language Arts All eligible student groups have score of less than 100. At least one eligible student group has a score of at least 100. All eligible student groups have a score of at least 100. All eligible student groups have a score of at least 150.
Academic Progress – Math All eligible student groups have a score of less than 100. At least one eligible student group has a score of at least 100. A scores of at least 100 for all eligible student group A scores of at least 150 for all eligible student group
Progress in English Language Proficiency  The average progress towards the student’s annual target is less than 65% The average progress towards the student’s annual target is between 65% and 80% The average progress towards the student’s annual target is between 80% and 95% The average progress towards the student’s annual target is greater than 95%
Academic Achievement – Math All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual target All eligible student groups made their annual targets All eligible student groups exceeded their annual targets by at least 10%
Academic Achievement – English Language Arts All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual target All eligible student groups made their annual targets All eligible student groups exceeded their annual targets by at least 10%
Graduation Rate – 4YR All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual graduation target All eligible student groups made their annual graduation targets All eligible student groups have met or exceeded the long-term goal of 90%
Graduation Rate – 5/6YR All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual graduation target All eligible student groups made their annual graduation targets All eligible student groups have met or exceeded the long-term goal of 92%

Based on student population performance within the school, each school will achieve performance level for each indicator that is applicable to the grade span (elementary/middle or high school). An example of performance levels for indicators is provided below:

report card

A school’s performance in the above indicators will determine the level of support available to the school.

tiers of supportTiers of Support

Maine has developed three Tiers of Support designed to direct various levels of assistance from the Maine DOE.

Tier III supports are designated specifically for schools experiencing the most significant challenges across all eligible student groups, and who also receive Title I funding.

Tiers I and II are designed to support both Title I and non-Title I schools.

Support levels are determined based on eligible student groups (individual student populations with at least ten [10] students). Tier III supports are determined based on the performance of all eligible student groups while Tiers I and II are based on individual student groups. Student populations with fewer than 10 students are not included as part of the indicators for the school, this is consistent with federal FERPA regulations.

Below is a detailed summary that describes how a school’s level of support is determined, and the various supports that are available at each Tier.

Tier I
Additional Targeted Supports and Intervention
Tier II
Targeted Supports and Intervention
Tier III
Comprehensive Supports and Intervention
Any school with one or more eligible student group/s not meeting state expectations across all indicators in one or more content areas Any school with one or more eligible student group/s not meeting state expectations in the same indicator for three (3) consecutive years Schools that receive Title I funding and where all eligible student groups are not meeting state expectations in all indicators in one or more content areas.
Professional development will be available regionally and statewide at no cost. With access to a regional school leadership coach, schools will be responsible for developing and implementing a school level plan, in partnership with stakeholders, to include at least one evidence-based intervention.   Professional development will be available at no cost and driven by the needs of school staff and students. Tier II supports will be available during the 2019-2020 school year. With the support of a school leadership coach, schools will be responsible for developing and implementing a school level plan, in partnership with stakeholders, to include at least one evidence-based intervention. Schools will also have access to additional federal funds to support the implementation of a school leadership team and a school plan. Professional development will be available at no cost and driven by the needs of school staff and students.

Example scenarios demonstrating how a school is identified to receive support will be provided in the next room article.

Further questions should be directed to Janette Kirk, Acting Director, Office of Learning Systems at janette.kirk@maine.gov.

What Is Progress in English Language Proficiency? #success4ME

Maine defines English language proficiency (ELP) as sufficient skill in English necessary to meaningfully access the curriculum. As part of Maine’s Model of School Support, part of Maine’s rollout of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), this indicator of school success focuses on English learners and measures the progress they make toward English language proficiency each school year. ESSA requires that each state include an indicator that gauges, “progress in achieving English language proficiency as defined by the State and measured by the assessments within a State-determined timeline for all English learners.”

What does this look like in Maine?

English learners are students who have a primary or home language other than English and are in the process of learning English. Around 3% of Maine’s students are English learners and their schools support them in learning English to succeed academically. They may receive English language support services inside or outside of their regular classes, through programs specifically for English language development, or through a variety of other supports. It usually takes 4-7 years for an English learner to become proficient in English, but this can vary depending on many factors.

Each year, English learners are administered ACCESS for ELLs, an assessment that measures a student’s ability to listen, speak, read, and write in English. A student’s overall score ranges from 1.0-6.0. In Maine, English language proficiency is defined as level 4.5, so the progress in English language proficiency indicator measures how much progress a student makes each year toward reaching level 4.5. A school’s score for progress in English language proficiency is based on the average percentage made towards the annual target for each student, where there are at least ten (10) English learners.

School level descriptors for progress in ELP is as follows:

Emerging Developing Meeting Excelling
The average progress towards the students’ annual target is less than 65% The average progress towards the students’ annual target is between 65% and 80% The average progress towards the students’ annual target is between 80% and 95% The average progress towards the students’ annual target is greater than 95%

How progress in ELP will be presented on the report card:

ELPreportcard1.png

In the example provided below, there are less than 5 students who are English learners and therefore the data has been suppressed (notated by a *).

ELPreportcard2

ELPreportcard3