Seeking a Math4ME Coach for the 2022-2023 and 2023-2024 School Years

Math4ME is designed to implement evidence-based professional development to improve math proficiency of students with disabilities by supporting their teachers’ instructional practices.  Math4ME training is grounded in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Mathematics Teaching Practices.  This training includes hands-on activities and interactive professional learning experiences that allow participants to gain a deeper understanding of core mathematics concepts and strategies.

The Office of Special Services is seeking a Math4ME Coach for the 2022-2023 and 2023-2024 school years.  The Math4ME Coach will be part of the Math4ME team creating training materials and facilitating small group and large group professional learning experiences around computational fluency, diagnostic assessment, and formative feedback.  This is a hybrid position with some in-person professional learning sessions, coaching events, and meetings.  To check out more about the Math4ME Project and the coach position, click here.

Interested in applying? Click here to fill out an application. The application window closes June 3, 2022.

Have questions? Reach out to the Math4ME Project coordinator, Anne-Marie Adamson at anne-marie.adamson@maine.gov.

Yarmouth Elementary School Principal Ryan Gleason Named 2023 Maine’s NAESP National Distinguished Principal

The Maine Principals’ Association (MPA) is pleased to announce that Ryan Gleason, Principal at Yarmouth Elementary School in Yarmouth, has been named Maine’s NAESP National Distinguished Principal for 2023.  Mr. Gleason was named Maine’s NAESP National Distinguished Principal at an all-school assembly at Yarmouth Elementary School recently and will be honored by the MPA at their annual Recognition Banquet on April 28, 2022.

According to a release from MPA, Mr. Gleason was chosen because he exudes all the qualities of an exemplary administrator through his efforts to empower students and develop relationships with stakeholders.  His leadership clearly meets the defined mission of Yarmouth Elementary School, “Empowering All Students to Create Fulfilling Lives in a Changing World.”

In announcing Mr. Gleason’s selection as 2023 Maine’s NAESP National Distinguished Principal, MPA Executive Director of the Professional Division, Dr. Holly Blair noted, “Principal Gleason has been chosen for his contributions to the well-being of the entire educational community, creating a positive environment and having the ability to motivate and inspire others.  The interpersonal relationships he has created and his ability to overcome extreme obstacles demonstrates the impeccable leadership that he provides for his students, staff, and community.”

Mr. Gleason graduated from the University of Maine in 1992 and then went on to receive his Assistant Principal Certificate from the University of Southern Maine in 2008.  He then received his Masters in Education in 2014 from St. Joseph’s College in Standish.

He began his educational career as Director of Admissions and teacher at St. Dominic Regional High School.  He then moved into the Assistant Principal role at Durham Community School in 2007 where he stayed until 2014 when he became the Assistant Principal at Falmouth Elementary School.  In 2017, Mr. Gleason became the proud principal of Yarmouth Elementary School where he has been ever since.

Mr. Gleason is a member of the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP) and the Maine Principals’ Association (MPA).

The Maine Principals’ Association is a professional association representing Maine’s K-12 principals, assistant principals, and career and technology center directors.  The Association dates to 1921 and focuses its work on promoting the principalship, supporting principals as educational leaders, and promoting and administering interscholastic activities in grades 9-12.

Messalonskee High School Principal Paula Callan Named 2023 Maine’s NASSP Principal of the Year

The Maine Principals’ Association (MPA) announced recently that Paula Callan, Principal at Messalonskee High School in Oakland, was named Maine’s NASSP (National Association of Secondary School Principals) Principal of the Year for 2023.  Ms. Callan was named at a recent all-school assembly at Messalonski High School, and she will be honored by the MPA at their annual awards banquet on April 28, 2022.

According to a release from MPA, Ms. Callan received the award for her continued commitment, collaboration, and student centered focus and her dedication to creating a welcoming environment at for all students.  According to one Messalonskee student, “Ms. Callan always does the best for students and sees the best in everyone.”

In announcing Ms. Callan’s selection as 2023 Maine’s NASSP Principal of the Year, MPA Executive Director of the Professional Division, Dr. Holly Blair noted, “Principal Callan is an exceptional administrator at the local, state, and national levels.  She clearly advocates for all educators and is completely committed to providing the best educational experience for all.  When I think of someone who holds the title of ‘Principal of the Year’, I cannot think of a better person to represent the State of Maine.”

In addition to being named “Maine’s NASSP Principal of the Year,” in 2015, she was also named, “Maine’s NASSP Assistant Principal of the Year.”  Paula Callan has served on the MPA Board of Directors since 2017 and has been the President of the Association for the past two years.

Ms. Callan received her Bachelor of Science Degree from the University of Maine, Farmington, in 1984 and then graduated in 1993 with a Masters of Education from the University of Maine, Orono.

Ms. Callan started her educational career as a special education teacher at the Farrington and Lincoln Elementary Schools in Augusta after which she was a special education teacher at Cony High School until 1994.   From there she moved into administration when she became the Assistant Headmaster of Lincoln Academy where she stayed for two years.  In 1996, Ms. Callan returned to Cony High School as the Assistant Principal.  After 4 years in this role, she became the Assistant Principal of Morse High School in Bath.  In 2002, Ms. Callan became the Assistant Principal of Messalonskee High School in Oakland until she moved into the role as principal in 2016 where she has remained ever since.

She is a member of the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) and the Maine Principals’ Association (MPA).

The Maine Principals’ Association is a professional association representing Maine’s K-12 principals, assistant principals, and career and technology center directors.  The Association dates to 1921 and focuses its work on promoting the principalship, supporting principals as educational leaders, and promoting and administering interscholastic activities in grades 9-12.

 

Indirect Cost Rate Approval Process

The Maine Department of Education would like to share updated information concerning our indirect cost rate approval process.

The Department issues an indirect cost rate for a specific fiscal year that is valid from July 1 to June 30 of the applicable fiscal year. The indirect cost rate is applied to the direct cost amount expended, not to the grant award. Indirect costs are recovered only to the extent of direct costs incurred.

To recover indirect costs, the LEA applies the indirect cost rate in affect for a given fiscal year or the term of the grant award to the direct expenditures less capital outlay during that fiscal year or the term of the grant award.

In order for districts to receive approval of their indirect cost rate, the audit reconciliation with MEFS must be completed. The Department also recommends completing the following training to all districts that apply: Indirect Cost Training Course FY 21 (ed.gov).

Development of Indirect Cost Rates:

  • The Department sources information from the LEA’s official annual upload to MEFS and the detail accounts that make up that report.
  • The Department will prepare a “preliminary indirect cost rate” for LEAs requesting an indirect cost rate and may be requested for certification.
  • Once preliminary indirect cost rates are provided to the LEA, the LEA shall provide information for subawards and subcontracts so to calculate an adjustment to the indirect cost rate prior to final certification.
  • Predetermined rates that are certified and the certifications will be published to: https://www.maine.gov/doe/funding/fiscalreview/compliance/indirectcostrate
  • Restricted indirect cost rates will be limited to 8%. Unrestricted indirect cost rates are limited to 15%. All preliminary calculated rates outside of the statistical norm are subject to review to ensure the proper classification of costs.

The following information has been added to the Indirect Cost Rate Agreement:

  • Distribution Base: MTDC Modified Total Direct Cost – Total direct costs excluding equipment, capital expenditures, participant support costs, pass-through funds, and the portion of each subaward (subcontract or subgrant) above $25,000 (each award; each year).
  • Applicable To: Restricted- Restricted rates apply to programs that require a restricted rate per 34 CFR 75.563 and 34 CFR 76.563.
  • Treatment of Fringe Benefits: Fringe benefits applicable to direct salaries and wages are treated as direct costs. Pursuant to 2 CFR 200.431, (b), (3), Paragraph (i), unused leave costs for all employees are allowable in the year of payment. The treatment of unused leave costs should be allocated as an indirect cost except for those employee salaries designated as a direct cost for the restricted rate calculation.
  • Capitalization Policy: Items of equipment are capitalized and depreciated if the initial acquisition cost is equal to or greater than $5,000.

If you have any questions as you review these printouts, please contact our School Finance Team member Mary Randall, mary.randall@maine.gov, for assistance.

It’s National Adoption Month in November – Here are Resources for Educators

November is National Adoption Month! We invite you to recognize and celebrate families that grew by adoption while raising awareness about the urgent need for permanent homes for children and young people in out-of-home (foster) care.

National Adoption Month, initiated in 1976 by Governor Dukakis and formalized by President Clinton in 1995, is an annual campaign sponsored by the Children’s Bureau of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in partnership with Child Welfare Information Gateway and AdoptUSKids.

This year, the campaign theme is Every Conversation Matters. Sharing the message about the need for families is critical, yet how information about the adoption experience is shared can have a significant impact on children and young people. This theme is particularly important for adolescents and young people in need of a forever family and a permanent home.

Every child with adoption experience has a story. Helping youth find their voice and the words to tell their story may be hard, but it also unlocks the potential to learn who their important mentors and supports are and may potentially uncover adoption resources.

With approximately 970 Maine children currently entering a relative’s home for placement from out-of-home care and 300 adoption legalizations annually, there are likely children in your school and classroom who are personally affected by adoption. There are great opportunities to provide parents and children with foundational language and resources that can barrier-bust long standing assumptions about adoption.

How you can help:

  • If you are an educator and are looking for support in navigating the complex social narratives, beliefs and questions the adoption experience often elicits (think family tree assignments), visit looking for tips and starting points to address those issues with your students, visit https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/adoption/adopt-parenting/school/ or https://www.americanadoptions.com/blog/
  • If you are an educator working with young children visit https://adoptionnetwork.com/ for helpful tools and resources. Or consider teaching a lesson about famous adoptees who have made a difference in the world. Even a small lesson can be incredibly useful in changing people’s opinions about how adoption really works — and promote tolerance among your students for those who may be affected by this process.
  • If your goal is to get actively involved in this important need, you may remain connected and informed throughout the month by following #AFamilyForMeMaine and #NationalAdoptionMonth on Facebook and raise awareness by asking friends, family and colleagues to join you.
  • Join the Poster Campaign: What Adoption Means to ME – Download this poster to find out more.

If you want to explore becoming an adoptive parent in Maine, please call A Family for ME at 1-844-893-6311 or visit https://afamilyformemaine.org/ to get started today.