2021 STEM for All Video Showcase May 11- 18

2021 STEM for All Video Showcase: Learning from Research and Practice
May 11 – 18, 2021
Online event, https://stemforall2021.videohall.com,

Researchers, practitioners, policy makers, informal educators, and parents interested in enhancing STEM education are invited to take part in a free, interactive, 8-day video showcase event, showcasing federally funded projects to improve STEM and computer science education. All are welcome to view, discuss, and vote for favorites from May 11-18.

The online event, https://stemforall2021.videohall.com, provides an opportunity to hear how programs across the nation have addressed the challenges posed by COVID and related school closures, particularly in underserved communities. Over 1,100 presenters and co-presenters have come together to share 287 3-minute videos. More than half of the presentations address racial or gender inequities and provide strategies to broaden participation and quality experiences for students of all ages, from the youngest elementary students to those pursuing graduate degrees. Collectively they provide a comprehensive introduction to the creative work being done across the nation to improve STEM education in both formal and informal environments.

Visitors to the site can filter the presentations by grade level, organization, state, keywords, or audience type to find those of greatest interest. In addition to discussing the videos, all visitors can vote for their favorite presentations. At the end of the event, presentations that received the most votes will be identified as “Public Choice” winners.

While most of the projects presented are funded by the National Science Foundation, there are also presentations from projects funded by 8 other federal agencies, including ED, NASA, NIH, NOAA, IMLS, US Dept. of State, ONR, and USDA.

Last year’s STEM for All Video Showcase is still being accessed, and to date has had over 87,500 unique visitors from 181 countries.

The STEM for All Video Showcase is hosted by TERC, in partnership with: STEMTLnetCADRECAISECIRCLSSTELARCS for All TeachersNARSTNCTMNSTANSF INCLUDES, and QEM. The Showcase is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation (#1922641).

To learn more about the Showcase and to watch the project videos, visit http://stemforall2021.videohall.com

 

 

Join Dr. Habib Dagher to learn about UMaine’s leading research in floating offshore wind

Tesday, May 11th, 9:00-10:00 am

There is an international race to develop floating wind turbine technologies.  Educators and students are cordially invited to learn about these technologies and how they can help Maine mitigate climate change and keep more energy dollars in the state.  Dr. Habib Dagher, executive director of the Advanced Structures and Composites Center at the University of Maine, will be leading a webinar about the pioneering research in floating offshore wind being conducted at UMaine.

Dr. Dagher will give a presentation geared towards middle school and high school audiences that will cover the engineering of floating wind turbines.  How does one design floating turbines that can survive 500-year storms?  How is the power brought back to shore?  How are these turbines anchored to the seabed?  How many turbines does one need to power Maine?

Register for the webinar today!

The event is free but limited to 1,000 participants. Please register ASAP!

  • Did you know that harnessing just 3% of the Gulf of Maine offshore wind resource can provide enough electricity to heat every home and drive every car in Maine?
  • The Gulf of Maine’s offshore wind capacity is equivalent to that of 156 nuclear power plants.
  • Researchers at UMaine are working with NASA to optimize the design of floating offshore wind platforms.

Learn this and more during Dr. Dagher’s presentation.

For more information contact Advanced Structures & Composites Center.

 

Deering High School Senior Is Top Winner at Maine State Science Fair

Linh Nguyen, a senior at Deering High School, is the First Place Grand Award winner in the 2021 Maine State Science Fair. Nguyen came out on top among the nearly 160 students competing for prestigious state titles and more than $1 million in scholarships and awards. She won for her research on how carbon nanotubes could be used as an inexpensive remover of arsenic in drinking water systems.

In other news, Nguyen also was named on April 8 as a Cooke College Scholar, one of just 61 students nationwide to receive that prestigious honor – and the only one from Maine. The Cooke College Scholars receive up to $40,000 annually for up to four years to attend the college or university of their choice, in addition to comprehensive advising and other program support.

Celebrating its 75th year, the Maine State Science Fair (MSSF) is organized by The Jackson Laboratory and Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance (MMSA). This year’s event took place virtually on April 3, and 157 students representing 23 Maine schools tuned in to present virtual research or engineering projects to a panel of judges and attend events.

Dr. Nirav Shah, director of the Maine Center for Disease Control, was the keynote speaker. Dr. Shah encouraged the students to communicate their science clearly to non-scientific audiences. “Just as important as learning the tools of science are learning the tools of science communication,” Shah said. “The principle that I always keep in my mind [when answering a scientific question] is you shouldn’t tell them how to build a clock, you should tell them what time it is, because that’s what they are really interested in.”

Nguyen’s research project has a very practical application. She won for her work titled “Applications of Carbon Nanotube Based Sorbents for Removal of Arsenic from Polluted Water.” She studied how carbon nanotubes could be used as an inexpensive remover of arsenic in drinking water systems, including private wells where arsenic contamination is prevalent. A nanotube is a microscopic tube whose diameter is measured in nanometers.

Nguyen was one of three Grand Award winners – students whose MSSF projects were judged to be at the top overall.

The Second Place Grand Award winner was Vetri Vel, a Bangor High School senior, who won for improving his fall-detection software that uses a thermal-imaging detector of his own creation. His system could help elderly people living alone detect falls and send a call for help. Mateus Nascimento, a junior at Brunswick High School, won the Third Place Grand Award for his project titled: “Animals Talk: Understanding Silk Moth Communication through Detection of Pheromones with an Electronic Nose.”

The three MSSF Grand Award winners are invited to form the Maine delegation to the Regeneron International Science and Engineering Fair. This is a significant honor and speaks to the quality and significance of the student’s research or engineering project. This year, the Regeneron ISEF is virtual and will be held in May. Regeneron ISEF is a competition with significant financial and scholarship awards.

In addition to winning the MSSF First Place Grand Award, Nguyen placed first in the Environmental Engineering category award. Nguyen also was the recipient of the first Cary James Water Ride Scholarship, a $5,000 scholarship that she can apply to the college of her choice.

Also, Nguyen was notified April 8 by the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation that she is one of their  2021 Cooke College Scholars. This year’s 61 recipients were chosen from a pool of more than 5,800 applicants nationwide. The Cooke College Scholarship Program seeks to close the gaps in higher education access for driven students with financial need. Along with financial support, Cooke College Scholars will receive ongoing educational advising and opportunities for internships, study abroad, and access to graduate school funding.

“Linh is the kind of student who inspires everyone around her. She is driven by her curiosity and she is not afraid of putting in the hard work needed to accomplish any task,” said Deering science teacher Cyle Davenport. “As someone fortunate enough to have her in two of my classes, I can say that her success at the MSSF is completely deserved. Linh does not give up. All of her teachers are overwhelmed with pride for this young woman; and we are all eager to see what she does next.”

Deering school counselor Libby Heselton said, “Linh is highly conscientious and determined, with an outstanding work ethic. She seeks to understand concepts rather than just complete assignments, and adds to her classmates’ learning with probing questions that tie back to ‘why this matters.’ She is all about collaborative problem solving. Linh’s character outshines even her academics.  Accordingly, she has the very difficult decision of choosing among Stanford, MIT, Harvard, Princeton, and Yale.”

“The Portland Public Schools is extremely proud of this talented, hardworking student,” said Superintendent Xavier Botana. “One of the primary goals of our Portland Promise, the district’s strategic plan, is to empower and prepare our students for 21st century careers, and STEM learning is key to achieving that goal. Linh’s work stands out. Her STEM knowledge is impressive and she used it to solve an important problem. She is an all-around student  leader and excels in everything she does. The credit goes to her and also to her teachers and others who have supported her along the way. We look forward to seeing all the ways in which Linh will continue to achieve in the future.”

Learn more about other Maine State  Science Fair awards and scholarship winners.

“This year’s Maine State Science Fair was an inspiring showcase of the STEM talent being fostered in Maine high schools,” said Michael McKernan, Program Director for STEM and Undergraduate Education at The Jackson Laboratory and a co-director of the Science Fair. “Students presented projects that were both highly creative and also relevant to pervasive issues in Maine.”

“It has been awe-inspiring to see the achievements of Maine’s students as the Science Fair has grown to involve more schools and educators from across the state,” said Dr. Ruth Kermish-Allen, executive director of the Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance (MMSA). “Our young people are creating outstanding scientific research that truly can make a difference in the world, and we are able to recognize those efforts through increased scholarships to diverse higher education options available to MSSF students. The creativity and innovation we see in these complex scientific studies highlights the amazing talents of Maine’s next generation of leaders.”

Information for this article was provided by Portland Public Schools as part of the Maine Schools Sharing Success Campaign. The Maine Schools Sharing Success Campaign is an avenue for Maine schools to celebrate successes and share innovative ideas, practices, and models that can be adapted and easily implemented by other Maine schools. Stories are not an endorsement of specific materials, services, or practices and are not intended to promote learning programs that are of cost to students, families, or schools. To submit a story or an idea, email it to Rachel at rachel.paling@maine.gov. 

Maine Students Present Research and Engineering Projects at 75th Annual Maine State Science Fair

Celebrating its 75th year, the Maine State Science Fair (MSSF), organized by The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) and Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance (MMSA), took place virtually on April 3, 2021. 157 students representing 23 schools in 8 Maine counties tuned in to present virtual research or engineering projects to a panel of judges and attend events. High school students from across the state competed for prestigious state titles and over $1 million in scholarships and awards.The winners were announced during a virtual award ceremony on April 3 at 3 pm ET. The event was headlined by keynote speaker Dr. Nirav Shah, director of the Maine Center for Disease Control.In his remarks, Dr. Shah encouraged the students to communicate their science clearly to non-scientific audiences. “Just as important as learning the tools of science are learning the tools of science communication,” Shah said. “The principal that I always keep in my mind [when answering a scientific question] is you shouldn’t tell them how to build a clock, you should tell them what time it is, because that’s what they are really interested in.”

“This year’s Maine State Science Fair was an inspiring showcase of the STEM talent being fostered in Maine high schools,” said Michael McKernan, Program Director for STEM and Undergraduate Education at The Jackson Laboratory and a co-Director of the Maine State Science Fair. “Students presented projects that were both highly creative and also relevant to pervasive issues in Maine.”

Linh Nguyen, a senior at Deering High School in Portland, studied how carbon nanotubes could be used as an inexpensive remover of arsenic in drinking water systems, including private wells where arsenic contamination is prevalent. Vetri Vel, a senior at Bangor High School, improved his fall-detection software which uses a thermal-imaging detector of his own creation. Vel’s system could be deployed in the homes of elderly people, living alone, to reliably and automatically detect falls and send a call for help. Ashton Caron, a senior at Nokomis High School in Newport, used GPS collars and chemical studies of pasture grass nutrition to study grazing patterns in cows. This could help Maine farmers better plan pasture rotations to sustain both the cows and their pasture resources.

The Grand Award winners were:

1.     First Award – Linh Nguyen, 12th grade, Deering High School. Applications of Carbon Nanotube Based Sorbents for Removal of Arsenic from Polluted Water.

2.     Second Award – Vetri Vel, 12th grade, Bangor High School. Readily Implementable Fall Detection System for the Elderly Using Thermal Image Segmentation and Convolutional Neural Networks.

3.     Third Award – Mateus Nascimento, 11th grade, Brunswick High School. How Animals Talk: Understanding Silk Moth Communication through Detection of Pheromones with an Electronic Nose.

“It has been awe-inspiring to see the achievements of Maine’s students as the Science Fair has grown to involve more schools and educators from across the state,” said Dr. Ruth Kermish-Allen, Executive Director of the Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance (MMSA). “Our young people are creating outstanding scientific research that truly can make a difference in the world, and we are able to recognize those efforts through increased scholarships to diverse higher education options available to MSSF students. The creativity and innovation we see in these complex scientific studies highlights the amazing talents of Maine’s next generation of leaders.”

In addition to the Grand Award prizes, more than $1 million in scholarships, including several full-tuition scholarships, from The University of Maine, College of the Atlantic, University of New England, University of Southern Maine, St. Joseph’s College of Maine, the University of Maine at Augusta, and Husson University were distributed to students who demonstrated creativity, innovation, aptitude and notable scientific potential.

For the first time, several Maine community colleges also offered and awarded scholarships. York County Community College, Central Maine Community College, and Southern Maine Community College each made one partial tuition scholarship. Additional students received awards for various achievements from JAX and MMSA.

The following students received full-tuition four-year Top Scholar awards from The University of Maine, including admission to the UMaine Honors College:

Emerson Harris, Boothbay Region High School

Zoe Stankevitz, Nokomis Regional High School

Ashton Caron, Nokomis Regional High School

Nora Goldberg-Courtney, Maine Coast Waldorf School

Nick Pease, Nokomis Regional High School

Matthew Gilbert, Greely High School

Ogechi Obi, Bangor High School

Grace Hall, Belfast Area High School

Ashly Nyman, Nokomis Regional High School

Carter Rice, Nokomis Regional High School

Quinn D’Alessio, Bangor High School

Maya Elkadi, Bangor High School

The following students received a $20,000 four-year scholarship from the College of the Atlantic, renewable for four years.

Nora Goldberg-Courtney, Maine Coast Waldorf School

Emerson Harris, Boothbay Region High School

The following students received a $5,000 four-year scholarship from the University of New England, renewable for four years:

Grace Hall, Belfast Area High School

Siobhan Duffy, Washington Academy

Emerson Harris, Boothbay Region High School

Maya Elkadi, Bangor High School

The following students received full-tuition four-year scholarships from the University of Southern Maine:

Quinn D’Alessio, Bangor High School

Emerson Harris, Boothbay Region High School

The following students received top merit scholarships from the University of Southern Maine, including a $5,000 award.

Tomas Cundick, Foster Technical Center

Grace Hall, Belfast Area High School

Nora Goldberg-Courtney, Maine Coast Waldorf School

Roland Ladd, Bangor High School

Virginia Weiss, Cape Elizabeth High School

Uyen Nguyen, John Bapst Memorial High School

Simon Socolow, Bangor High School

Siobhan Duffy, Washington Academy

The following students received a $2,500 four-year scholarship from St. Joseph’s College of Maine:

Grace Hall, Belfast Area High School

Uyen Nguyen, John Bapst Memorial High School

The following students received a $1,500 four-year scholarship from the University of Maine at Augusta, renewable for four years:

Nora Goldberg-Courtney, Maine Coast Waldorf School

Roland Ladd, Bangor High School

The following students received a $1,000 scholarship from Husson University:

Grace Hall, Belfast Area High School

Jordan Boyd, Nokomis Regional High School

Cassidy Hodges, Nokomis Regional High School

Ella Donaghy, Medomak Valley High School

Other awards included:

York County Community College awarded a $1,000 scholarship to Amber-Rae Pesek, Hancock County Technical Center.

Central Maine Community College awarded a one semester full-tuition scholarship to Lillian Philbrook, Hancock County Technical Center.

Southern Maine Community College awarded a one semester full-tuition scholarship to Virginia Weiss, Cape Elizabeth High School.

Linh Nguyen, Deering High School, was awarded the $5,000 Cary James Water Ride Scholarship.

The JAX Promising Scientist Award for outstanding research and engineering projects by 1st year students, was presented to:

Mary McPheeters, Falmouth High School

Alexander Benton, Maine Coast Waldorf School

Audrey Hufnagel, Lincoln Academy

Katie Nakai, Brunswick High School

Avery Matthews, Falmouth High School

The Reach Award for students from schools who are new to the Maine State Science Fair, given by the MMSA, was presented to:

The team of Anna Molloy, James Wheeler, Orono High School

The team of Esme Song, Penelope Haydar, Caroline Gentile, Cape Elizabeth High School

The full list of special awards is posted online at https://www.jax.org/mssf

Each category of research project includes three top prizes. The MSSF Category Winners are as follows:

Animal Sciences

1st – Patrick Wahlig, Falmouth High School

2nd – Runzhe Yao, Gould Academy

3rd – Ashton Caron, Nokomis Regional High School

Behavioral Sciences – Psychology

1st – Sciatzy Solis, Medomak Valley High School

2nd – Vy Do, Washington Academy

3rd – Olivia Whitten, Nokomis Regional High School

Biological Sciences

1st – Mateus Nascimento, Brunswick High School

2nd – Simon Socolow, Bangor High School

3rd – Ariel Larrabee, Hancock County Technical Center

Biomedical and Health Sciences

1st – Emerson Harris, Boothbay Region High School

2nd – Coco Xu, Falmouth High School

3rd – McHenna Martin, Hancock County Technical Center

Chemistry

1st – Auburn Putz-Burton, Gould Academy

2nd – Jiaqi Li, Gould Academy

3rd – Grace Leschey and Virginia Weiss, Cape Elizabeth High School

Computer Sciences

1st – Nick Pease, Nokomis Regional High School

2nd – Alex Hardy, Foster Technical Center

3rd – Cuthbert Steadman and Beckett Mundell-Wood, Bangor High School

Data Science

1st – Madyson Redding, Old Town High School

2nd – Maia Pietraho, Brunswick High School

3rd – Jack Nussbaum, Brunswick High School

Engineering

1st – Vetri Vel, Bangor High School

2nd – Brady McQuaid, Brunswick High School

3rd – Jordan Boyd, Nokomis Regional High School

Environmental Engineering

1st – Linh Nguyen, Deering High School

2nd – Maya Elkadi and McKayla Kendall, Bangor High School, Bangor High School

3rd – Frederick Oldenburg and Roland Ladd, Bangor High School, Bangor High School

Environmental Science

1st – Swetha Palaniappan, Cape Elizabeth High School

2nd – Paula Dauphinais and Nancy Dauphinais, Nokomis Regional High School

3rd – Ruth White, Orono High School

Environmental Science – Water

1st – Miranda LeClair, Old Town High School

2nd – Ginny Hunt, Bangor High School

3rd – Quinn D’Alessio, Bangor High School

Materials Science

1st – Ogechi Obi, Bangor High School

2nd – Jinkyu Kim, Gould Academy

3rd – MacKenna Carter, Machias Memorial High School

Physics and Energy

1st – Mia Smith Old Town, High School

2nd – Nuthi Ganesh, Bangor High School

3rd – Will Caron, Bangor High School

Plant Science

1st – Meaghan Caron, Bangor High School

2nd – Nora Goldberg-Courtney, Maine Coast Waldorf School

3rd – Bryce Carter, Hancock County Technical Center

Maine State Science Fair is further supported by Central Maine Power, AV Technik, Society for Science, Maine Technology Institute, Texas Instruments, Maine Space Grant Consortium, IEEE, Hancock Lumber, Fiber Materials, Inc., and Wipfli CPAs and Consultants.

Information for this article was provided by The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) and Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance (MMSA) as part of the Maine Schools Sharing Success Campaign. The Maine Schools Sharing Success Campaign is an avenue for Maine schools to celebrate successes and share innovative ideas, practices, and models that can be adapted and easily implemented by other Maine schools. Stories are not an endorsement of specific materials, services, or practices and are not intended to promote learning programs that are of cost to students, families, or schools. To submit a story or an idea, email it to Rachel at rachel.paling@maine.gov. 

We Want to Hear How Climate Science is Taught in Maine Classrooms 

Whether your students are exploring energy alternatives, their carbon footprint, how to protect ecosystems and water sources, sea level rise along the coast, warming in the Gulf of Maine, or mitigating health costs of Lyme, mosquito-borne illnesses and damage to Maine’s infrastructure, we want to hear from you!  

With the adoption of new science Maine Learning Results in 2019 (Next Generation Science Standards), the release of the Maine Climate Council’s Four-Year Plan for Climate Action in 2020, and a renewed focus on climate issues, we want to hear how Maine classrooms are addressing climate science. We are interested in school and community-based examples and innovative partnerships.  

Please forward any stories, examples, photos to shari.templeton@maine.gov with a subject line of “Climate Education” for the Department of Education (DOE) to highlight and share state-wide We are designing a website that will be populated with exemplars, resources, and networking opportunities across the state.  

As proposed in the Climate Council’s plan, the DOE is exploring the convening of stakeholders to “consider next steps to implement increased climate and career education. If you are interested in serving on a planning team to develop a state plan for climate education, please complete the form found at this link. 

Thank you for helping us to highlight and celebrate the important work you are doing!