Recording & Materials from Presentation About ESSA & Report Cards

The Maine Department of Education held a presentation on Monday, December 10 about the details of Maine’s Model of School Support under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) which includes the release of the new, user-friendly, public Report Cards in early January. Below is a link to a recording of the session and links to the PowerPoint Presentation, in addition to all of the handouts from the presentation.

Further questions about Maine’s ESSA Plan, Maine’s Model of School Support, and the Report Cards should be directed to Acting Director of Learning Systems, Janette Kirk Janette.Kirk@maine.gov or ESEA Federal Programs & School Turnaround Director Chelsey Fortin-Trimble Chelsey.A.Fortin@maine.gov.

PRESS RELEASE: Maine DOE Awarded $2.88M Grant to Support School Emergency Operations Plan Initiative

Update: Schools will receive an invitation from the Department to participate in grant activities this spring. 

The Maine Department of Education has been awarded a 5-year grant from the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, U.S. Department of Education. The funding will go towards an initiative called Maine Grant for School Emergency Management aimed at helping Maine schools by providing training and technical assistance in the development and implementation of high-quality school emergency operations plans (EOPS).

This project is grounded in the belief that multihazard emergency planning for schools helps schools and communities prepare for, respond to, and recover from critical incidents. The Maine Grant for School Emergency Management project is the next step of work that began with a Maine School Security Report that was initiated by the Maine Legislature.

The primary goals of the Maine Grant for School Emergency Management project are to:

  1. Provide schools, especially those identified as high need in rural areas, with high-quality EOP training at no cost.
  2. Ensure that local educational agencies have access at no cost to a new customizable EOP template that can be easily updated and includes technical guidance.
  3. Provide high-quality EOP technical assistance clinics at no cost that will be delivered to develop a team of education sector professionals who are committed to work with schools.

The grant allocation is over five years:

Year 1: $614,773
Year 2: $567,920
Year 3: $567,920
Year 4: $567,920
Year 5: $567,920
Grant Total:  $2,886,453

The grant activities, as awarded, are one hundred percent federally funded. No project costs will be financed by non-governmental sources.

The Department of Education takes school safety, security, emergency management, and preparedness seriously and is continually taking steps to improve it.

Further questions and inquiries can be send to Pat Hinckley, Maine DOE Transportation and Facilities Administrator at pat.hinckley@maine.gov.

Resources to Support the Observance of Alcohol Awareness Day

Alcohol is the most frequently used substance by adolescents in Maine. Almost one of every four Maine high school students used alcohol in the past 30 days, and more than one third of those students reported binge drinking (2017 Maine Integrated Youth Health Survey). Alcohol consumption by students is impacted by factors such as low perception of harm, low perception of getting caught, and ease of access.

Schools and community organizations are encouraged to work together to address alcohol issues. In alignment with Maine statute, schools across Maine can raise awareness about alcohol use and abuse by observing Alcohol Awareness Day on Monday, December 3 (or another designated day in December). The statute indicates Alcohol Awareness Day shall be observed by studying for at least 45 minutes, a constructive approach toward the use of alcohol and the problems and dangers of alcohol abuse upon the individual, the family and society.

Consider using one or more of the following resources to prepare a message or lesson to enhance your existing health education curriculum:

It is important for Maine students to receive education and awareness about alcohol, tobacco and other drug use as part of comprehensive school health education, Pre-K through High School, and in alignment with the Maine Learning Results: Parameters for Essential Instruction, Health Education StandardsSelecting Evidence-Based Substance Use Prevention Programs: A Guide for Maine Schools Grades K-12 may help determine the most appropriate program for a school community.

There is also a guide to help schools create, update, and enforce a substance use policy. The guide, “Substance Use Policy: A Comprehensive Guide for School Policy Development provides practical suggestions for a complete policy, based on research and best practices.

For assistance or additional resources, contact the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Tobacco and Substance Use Prevention and Control Program at 287-8901, TTY 711 or email: TSUP.DHHS@maine.gov.  You can order a limited quantity of free alcohol use prevention pamphlets through the Prevention Store http://www.mainepreventionstore.org./

What Does Accountability Mean for a School?

Maine’s Model of School Support includes five indicators that focus on key areas of school and student success, adhere to the requirements of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), and directly align to Maine’s Priorities and Goals. Below is the list of indicators of school success:

  1. Chronic Absenteeism (K-12)
  2. Academic Progress (Grades 3-8 Only)
  3. Progress in English Language Proficiency (ELP) for English Learners (K-12)
  4. Academic Achievement (Grades 3-8, High School)
  5. Graduation Rate (High School Only)

Eligible individual student populations (where there are ten or more students of a specific student population) are also measured to identify where targeted support is needed. Student populations include: economically disadvantaged, students with disabilities, English learners, and students who are white, black, Asian, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, Native American, Hispanic, or two or more races.

To determine each school’s performance on the indicators listed above, Maine uses data collected from public schools on an annual basis to provide each school with a performance rating on each applicable indicator.

School Indicators & Performance Levels

The chart below summarizes the indicators used in Maine’s Model of School Support for Maine’s public elementary, middle, and/or high schools. In addition, the criteria surrounding the performance levels for each indicator has been provided.

Indicators Performance Level
Emerging Developing Meeting Excelling
Chronic Absenteeism All eligible student group populations have a chronic absenteeism rate of 10% or higher. At least one eligible student group has a chronic absenteeism rate of less than 10%. All eligible student groups have a chronic absenteeism rate of less than 10%. All eligible student groups have a chronic absenteeism rate of 5% or less.
Academic Progress – English Language Arts All eligible student groups have score of less than 100. At least one eligible student group has a score of at least 100. All eligible student groups have a score of at least 100. All eligible student groups have a score of at least 150.
Academic Progress – Math All eligible student groups have a score of less than 100. At least one eligible student group has a score of at least 100. A scores of at least 100 for all eligible student group A scores of at least 150 for all eligible student group
Progress in English Language Proficiency  The average progress towards the student’s annual target is less than 65% The average progress towards the student’s annual target is between 65% and 80% The average progress towards the student’s annual target is between 80% and 95% The average progress towards the student’s annual target is greater than 95%
Academic Achievement – Math All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual target All eligible student groups made their annual targets All eligible student groups exceeded their annual targets by at least 10%
Academic Achievement – English Language Arts All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual target All eligible student groups made their annual targets All eligible student groups exceeded their annual targets by at least 10%
Graduation Rate – 4YR All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual graduation target All eligible student groups made their annual graduation targets All eligible student groups have met or exceeded the long-term goal of 90%
Graduation Rate – 5/6YR All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual graduation target All eligible student groups made their annual graduation targets All eligible student groups have met or exceeded the long-term goal of 92%

Based on student population performance within the school, each school will achieve performance level for each indicator that is applicable to the grade span (elementary/middle or high school). An example of performance levels for indicators is provided below:

report card

A school’s performance in the above indicators will determine the level of support available to the school.

tiers of supportTiers of Support

Maine has developed three Tiers of Support designed to direct various levels of assistance from the Maine DOE.

Tier III supports are designated specifically for schools experiencing the most significant challenges across all eligible student groups, and who also receive Title I funding.

Tiers I and II are designed to support both Title I and non-Title I schools.

Support levels are determined based on eligible student groups (individual student populations with at least ten [10] students). Tier III supports are determined based on the performance of all eligible student groups while Tiers I and II are based on individual student groups. Student populations with fewer than 10 students are not included as part of the indicators for the school, this is consistent with federal FERPA regulations.

Below is a detailed summary that describes how a school’s level of support is determined, and the various supports that are available at each Tier.

Tier I
Additional Targeted Supports and Intervention
Tier II
Targeted Supports and Intervention
Tier III
Comprehensive Supports and Intervention
Any school with one or more eligible student group/s not meeting state expectations across all indicators in one or more content areas Any school with one or more eligible student group/s not meeting state expectations in the same indicator for three (3) consecutive years Schools that receive Title I funding and where all eligible student groups are not meeting state expectations in all indicators in one or more content areas.
Professional development will be available regionally and statewide at no cost. With access to a regional school leadership coach, schools will be responsible for developing and implementing a school level plan, in partnership with stakeholders, to include at least one evidence-based intervention.   Professional development will be available at no cost and driven by the needs of school staff and students. Tier II supports will be available during the 2019-2020 school year. With the support of a school leadership coach, schools will be responsible for developing and implementing a school level plan, in partnership with stakeholders, to include at least one evidence-based intervention. Schools will also have access to additional federal funds to support the implementation of a school leadership team and a school plan. Professional development will be available at no cost and driven by the needs of school staff and students.

Example scenarios demonstrating how a school is identified to receive support will be provided in the next room article.

Further questions should be directed to Janette Kirk, Acting Director, Office of Learning Systems at janette.kirk@maine.gov.

Information and Resources About Maine’s New Tobacco Retail Sales Law

The Maine CDC Tobacco Prevention Program has released information and resources about on Tobacco 21 (T21), Maine’s new tobacco retail sales law.

Tobacco 21 is Maine’s new retail tobacco sales law that went into effect July 1, 2018. A person may not sell, offer to sell, furnish, or give away a tobacco product to any person under 21 years of age unless the person had turned 18 years of age by July 1, 2018. People who were 18-year-olds as of July 1, 2018 can still buy tobacco products. With the passing of the law, it updated enforcement and compliance activities by the removal of all Minor In Possession or Possession Use and Purchase (MIP/PUP) language in state code. By eliminating the MIP/PUP language it concentrates enforcement and compliance activities on the source of tobacco rather than the youth purchasing.

Further questions should be directed to Emily Moores, Tobacco Prevention and Control Manager, Maine CDC at Emily.Moores@Maine.gov or 207-287-3268.