Maine Department of Education

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Maine DOE Update – November 21, 2018

From the Maine Department of Education


Reporting Items

Dropout Reporting Opens November 26, 2018

This is a reminder that Dropout reporting begins the Monday following Thanksgiving weekend. The report will be open from November 26, 2018 to December 14, 2018. This report is located in the “Graduation Data” module in NEO, along with the Graduation reports from the 2017/18 school year. The module is located here: | More

| Visit the DC&R Reporting Calendar |


News & Updates

What Is Progress in English Language Proficiency? #success4ME

Maine defines English language proficiency (ELP) as sufficient skill in English necessary to meaningfully access the curriculum. As part of Maine’s Model of School Support, part of Maine’s rollout of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), this indicator of school success focuses on English learners and measures the progress they make toward English language proficiency each school year. ESSA requires that each state include an indicator that gauges, “progress in achieving English language proficiency as defined by the State and measured by the assessments within a State-determined timeline for all English learners.” | More

Question and Answer About New IEP Form

As per the newsroom notice dated September 26, 2018, the implementation of the new IEP form that incorporates Behavioral Health Day Treatment was delayed until January 1, 2019 to allow time to provide answers to questions received from the field.| More

Information and Resources About Maine’s New Tobacco Retail Sales Law

The Maine CDC Tobacco Prevention Program has released information and resources about on Tobacco 21 (T21), Maine’s new tobacco retail sales law. | More

National Assessment Governing Board Makes Small Changes to NAEP Achievement Level Descriptors

In an effort to reduce the confusion regarding the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) achievement levels and the misuse of NAEP data, the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB) slightly modified the names of the performance levels. In the November 18, 2019 posting on the “Curriculum Matters” blog on Education Week’s, there is an update on the small changes made to the achievement levels for the NAEP. | More

More Dispatches | Press Releases | Priority Notices


Professional Development & Training Opportunities

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Latest DOE Career/Project Opportunities

Information and Resources About Maine’s New Tobacco Retail Sales Law

The Maine CDC Tobacco Prevention Program has released information and resources about on Tobacco 21 (T21), Maine’s new tobacco retail sales law.

Tobacco 21 is Maine’s new retail tobacco sales law that went into effect July 1, 2018. A person may not sell, offer to sell, furnish, or give away a tobacco product to any person under 21 years of age unless the person had turned 18 years of age by July 1, 2018. People who were 18-year-olds as of July 1, 2018 can still buy tobacco products. With the passing of the law, it updated enforcement and compliance activities by the removal of all Minor In Possession or Possession Use and Purchase (MIP/PUP) language in state code. By eliminating the MIP/PUP language it concentrates enforcement and compliance activities on the source of tobacco rather than the youth purchasing.

Further questions should be directed to Emily Moores, Tobacco Prevention and Control Manager, Maine CDC at Emily.Moores@Maine.gov or 207-287-3268.

Dropout Reporting Opens November 26, 2018

This is a reminder that Dropout reporting begins the Monday following Thanksgiving weekend. The report will be open from November 26, 2018 to December 14, 2018. This report is located in the “Graduation Data” module in NEO, along with the Graduation reports from the 2017/18 school year. The module is located here: https://neo.maine.gov/doe/neo/graduation

The reporting process will follow the same structure as graduation reporting. Individual reports must be completed for each school in the district that has grades anywhere from 7 to 12. Once all the reports are completed, the reports need to be submitted to the Maine DOE. Maine DOE staff will then review/approve each report and submit them back to the School Administrative Unit for certification. Certification must be done by the Superintendent. Once the ‘Certify’ button is pressed on the summary screen, this will complete the dropout reporting process. Detailed instructions for this process can be found here.

Since dropouts could not be calculated until after the October 1 enrollments have been completed, it was necessary to remove the dropout rate reporting out of the graduation rate reporting process.

Some things to note for this process:

Dropouts are:

  • Students who are part of the 2017/18 Cohort that were enrolled in the 2017/18 school year and were exited with a code indicating that the student was expected to return in the 2018/19 school year, but for whom there have been no enrollments in the 2018/19 school year so far.
  • Students in grades 7 through 12 who exited in 2017/18 with a code that correlates to being a dropout.

 

Future Dropouts are:

  • Students in grades 7 through 12 who are part of a Cohort after the 2017/18 Cohort that were exited in the 2017/18 school year with a code indicating that the student was expected to return in the 2018/19 school year, but for whom there have been no enrollments in the 2018/19 school year. If no enrollments appear in the 2018/19 school year for them, they will receive a dropout count during the 2019 dropout reporting period.

 

If you have questions regarding the process for dropout reporting, contact Trevor Burns 207-624-6678

What Is Progress in English Language Proficiency? #success4ME

Maine defines English language proficiency (ELP) as sufficient skill in English necessary to meaningfully access the curriculum. As part of Maine’s Model of School Support, part of Maine’s rollout of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), this indicator of school success focuses on English learners and measures the progress they make toward English language proficiency each school year. ESSA requires that each state include an indicator that gauges, “progress in achieving English language proficiency as defined by the State and measured by the assessments within a State-determined timeline for all English learners.”

What does this look like in Maine?

English learners are students who have a primary or home language other than English and are in the process of learning English. Around 3% of Maine’s students are English learners and their schools support them in learning English to succeed academically. They may receive English language support services inside or outside of their regular classes, through programs specifically for English language development, or through a variety of other supports. It usually takes 4-7 years for an English learner to become proficient in English, but this can vary depending on many factors.

Each year, English learners are administered ACCESS for ELLs, an assessment that measures a student’s ability to listen, speak, read, and write in English. A student’s overall score ranges from 1.0-6.0. In Maine, English language proficiency is defined as level 4.5, so the progress in English language proficiency indicator measures how much progress a student makes each year toward reaching level 4.5. A school’s score for progress in English language proficiency is based on the average percentage made towards the annual target for each student, where there are at least ten (10) English learners.

School level descriptors for progress in ELP is as follows:

Emerging Developing Meeting Excelling
The average progress towards the students’ annual target is less than 65% The average progress towards the students’ annual target is between 65% and 80% The average progress towards the students’ annual target is between 80% and 95% The average progress towards the students’ annual target is greater than 95%

How progress in ELP will be presented on the report card:

ELPreportcard1.png

In the example provided below, there are less than 5 students who are English learners and therefore the data has been suppressed (notated by a *).

ELPreportcard2

ELPreportcard3

 

National Assessment Governing Board Makes Small Changes to NAEP Achievement Level Descriptors

In an effort to reduce the confusion regarding the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) achievement levels and the misuse of NAEP data, the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB) slightly modified the names of the performance levels. In the November 18, 2019 posting on the “Curriculum Matters” blog on Education Week’s, there is an update on the small changes made to the achievement levels for the NAEP.

From this point forward, the NAEP achievement levels will contain the NAEP acronym such as “NAEP basic” and “NAEP proficient”.  With the current emphasis on the reporting of student performance in the form of achievement levels, NAGB made this change to reduce the direct comparison of the NAEP levels of proficiency with those used by the individual states.

After each state-level NAEP assessment report is completed, a mapping study is conducted that provides a guide for the examination of state proficiency standards in relation to the NAEP scales.  The publication of the “Mapping State Proficiency Standards Onto NAEP Scales” reports are released much later than the Nations Report Card report and the State Snapshot reports since the data and analyses from these reports is required to conduct the mapping study.

For further information about NAEP, contact Regina Lewis, Maine DOE Coordinator of NAEP & International Assessments at Regina.Lewis@maine.gov.