Recording & Materials from Presentation About ESSA & Report Cards

The Maine Department of Education held a presentation on Monday, December 10 about the details of Maine’s Model of School Support under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) which includes the release of the new, user-friendly, public Report Cards in early January. Below is a link to a recording of the session and links to the PowerPoint Presentation, in addition to all of the handouts from the presentation.

Further questions about Maine’s ESSA Plan, Maine’s Model of School Support, and the Report Cards should be directed to Acting Director of Learning Systems, Janette Kirk Janette.Kirk@maine.gov or ESEA Federal Programs & School Turnaround Director Chelsey Fortin-Trimble Chelsey.A.Fortin@maine.gov.

What Does Accountability Mean for a School?

Maine’s Model of School Support includes five indicators that focus on key areas of school and student success, adhere to the requirements of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), and directly align to Maine’s Priorities and Goals. Below is the list of indicators of school success:

  1. Chronic Absenteeism (K-12)
  2. Academic Progress (Grades 3-8 Only)
  3. Progress in English Language Proficiency (ELP) for English Learners (K-12)
  4. Academic Achievement (Grades 3-8, High School)
  5. Graduation Rate (High School Only)

Eligible individual student populations (where there are ten or more students of a specific student population) are also measured to identify where targeted support is needed. Student populations include: economically disadvantaged, students with disabilities, English learners, and students who are white, black, Asian, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, Native American, Hispanic, or two or more races.

To determine each school’s performance on the indicators listed above, Maine uses data collected from public schools on an annual basis to provide each school with a performance rating on each applicable indicator.

School Indicators & Performance Levels

The chart below summarizes the indicators used in Maine’s Model of School Support for Maine’s public elementary, middle, and/or high schools. In addition, the criteria surrounding the performance levels for each indicator has been provided.

Indicators Performance Level
Emerging Developing Meeting Excelling
Chronic Absenteeism All eligible student group populations have a chronic absenteeism rate of 10% or higher. At least one eligible student group has a chronic absenteeism rate of less than 10%. All eligible student groups have a chronic absenteeism rate of less than 10%. All eligible student groups have a chronic absenteeism rate of 5% or less.
Academic Progress – English Language Arts All eligible student groups have score of less than 100. At least one eligible student group has a score of at least 100. All eligible student groups have a score of at least 100. All eligible student groups have a score of at least 150.
Academic Progress – Math All eligible student groups have a score of less than 100. At least one eligible student group has a score of at least 100. A scores of at least 100 for all eligible student group A scores of at least 150 for all eligible student group
Progress in English Language Proficiency  The average progress towards the student’s annual target is less than 65% The average progress towards the student’s annual target is between 65% and 80% The average progress towards the student’s annual target is between 80% and 95% The average progress towards the student’s annual target is greater than 95%
Academic Achievement – Math All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual target All eligible student groups made their annual targets All eligible student groups exceeded their annual targets by at least 10%
Academic Achievement – English Language Arts All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual target All eligible student groups made their annual targets All eligible student groups exceeded their annual targets by at least 10%
Graduation Rate – 4YR All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual graduation target All eligible student groups made their annual graduation targets All eligible student groups have met or exceeded the long-term goal of 90%
Graduation Rate – 5/6YR All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual graduation target All eligible student groups made their annual graduation targets All eligible student groups have met or exceeded the long-term goal of 92%

Based on student population performance within the school, each school will achieve performance level for each indicator that is applicable to the grade span (elementary/middle or high school). An example of performance levels for indicators is provided below:

report card

A school’s performance in the above indicators will determine the level of support available to the school.

tiers of supportTiers of Support

Maine has developed three Tiers of Support designed to direct various levels of assistance from the Maine DOE.

Tier III supports are designated specifically for schools experiencing the most significant challenges across all eligible student groups, and who also receive Title I funding.

Tiers I and II are designed to support both Title I and non-Title I schools.

Support levels are determined based on eligible student groups (individual student populations with at least ten [10] students). Tier III supports are determined based on the performance of all eligible student groups while Tiers I and II are based on individual student groups. Student populations with fewer than 10 students are not included as part of the indicators for the school, this is consistent with federal FERPA regulations.

Below is a detailed summary that describes how a school’s level of support is determined, and the various supports that are available at each Tier.

Tier I
Additional Targeted Supports and Intervention
Tier II
Targeted Supports and Intervention
Tier III
Comprehensive Supports and Intervention
Any school with one or more eligible student group/s not meeting state expectations across all indicators in one or more content areas Any school with one or more eligible student group/s not meeting state expectations in the same indicator for three (3) consecutive years Schools that receive Title I funding and where all eligible student groups are not meeting state expectations in all indicators in one or more content areas.
Professional development will be available regionally and statewide at no cost. With access to a regional school leadership coach, schools will be responsible for developing and implementing a school level plan, in partnership with stakeholders, to include at least one evidence-based intervention.   Professional development will be available at no cost and driven by the needs of school staff and students. Tier II supports will be available during the 2019-2020 school year. With the support of a school leadership coach, schools will be responsible for developing and implementing a school level plan, in partnership with stakeholders, to include at least one evidence-based intervention. Schools will also have access to additional federal funds to support the implementation of a school leadership team and a school plan. Professional development will be available at no cost and driven by the needs of school staff and students.

Example scenarios demonstrating how a school is identified to receive support will be provided in the next room article.

Further questions should be directed to Janette Kirk, Acting Director, Office of Learning Systems at janette.kirk@maine.gov.

What Is Progress in English Language Proficiency? #success4ME

Maine defines English language proficiency (ELP) as sufficient skill in English necessary to meaningfully access the curriculum. As part of Maine’s Model of School Support, part of Maine’s rollout of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), this indicator of school success focuses on English learners and measures the progress they make toward English language proficiency each school year. ESSA requires that each state include an indicator that gauges, “progress in achieving English language proficiency as defined by the State and measured by the assessments within a State-determined timeline for all English learners.”

What does this look like in Maine?

English learners are students who have a primary or home language other than English and are in the process of learning English. Around 3% of Maine’s students are English learners and their schools support them in learning English to succeed academically. They may receive English language support services inside or outside of their regular classes, through programs specifically for English language development, or through a variety of other supports. It usually takes 4-7 years for an English learner to become proficient in English, but this can vary depending on many factors.

Each year, English learners are administered ACCESS for ELLs, an assessment that measures a student’s ability to listen, speak, read, and write in English. A student’s overall score ranges from 1.0-6.0. In Maine, English language proficiency is defined as level 4.5, so the progress in English language proficiency indicator measures how much progress a student makes each year toward reaching level 4.5. A school’s score for progress in English language proficiency is based on the average percentage made towards the annual target for each student, where there are at least ten (10) English learners.

School level descriptors for progress in ELP is as follows:

Emerging Developing Meeting Excelling
The average progress towards the students’ annual target is less than 65% The average progress towards the students’ annual target is between 65% and 80% The average progress towards the students’ annual target is between 80% and 95% The average progress towards the students’ annual target is greater than 95%

How progress in ELP will be presented on the report card:

ELPreportcard1.png

In the example provided below, there are less than 5 students who are English learners and therefore the data has been suppressed (notated by a *).

ELPreportcard2

ELPreportcard3

 

What is Graduation Rate? #success4ME

The graduation rate indicator is one of four indicators used in Maine’s Model of School Support. It will be used as an indicator of success for high schools only. Graduation is defined as graduating within four years after entering ninth grade. In Maine, the graduation rate indicator reflects the number of students graduating “on-time”, as well as the graduating students who progressed at a different rate and graduated in either five or six years.

In the past, graduation rate was never utilized when making determinations of schools eligible to receive support. Under Maine’s Model of School Support, the graduation rate for students meeting graduation requirements in four years in addition to the graduation rate of students meeting graduation requirements in five or six years will be utilized.

graduation rate 4 yr (blue)
4 Year Graduation Rate

What does this look like in Maine?

Achieving a diploma is a major accomplishment and marks a significant milestone in a student’s life. It is important to highlight the number of students achieving a diploma, whether it takes some students four years or longer to do so. As it relates to Maine’s Model of School Support, the Graduation Rate indicator is split into two rates of graduation:

  • graduation 5_6 yr (blue)
    5 and 6 Year Graduation Rate

    The 4-year rate is the number of students who graduate in four years with a high school diploma, divided by the number of students who form the adjusted cohort for the graduating class.

  • The 5 and 6 year rates reflect the number of graduating students who took 5 and 6 years, respectively to graduate from high school.

How will graduation rate data be presented on the school report card?

The school as a whole will receive a performance measure related to individual student groups meeting the annual graduation target.

Graduation Performance Descriptors:

Graduation – 4 Year

Emerging Developing Meeting Excelling
No eligible student group made their annual graduation target At least one eligible student group made their annual graduation target All eligible student groups made their annual graduation target All eligible student groups have met or exceeded the long-term goal of 90%

Graduation – Combined 5/6 Year

Emerging Developing Meeting Excelling
No eligible student group made their annual graduation target At least one eligible student group made their annual graduation target All eligible student groups made their annual graduation target All eligible student groups have met or exceeded the long-term goal of 92%

Eligible student groups include: Asian, Black, Hispanic/Latino, Two or More Races, White, Students with Disabilities, Economically Disadvantaged, Migrant Students, and English Learners.

Goals for four year adjusted cohort graduation rate:

Subgroup Baseline (Data and Year) Long-term Goal (Data and Year) 2030
All students 86.83% 2016 90% or maintain current 2016, whichever is greater, graduation percentages by 2030
Economically disadvantaged students 77.77% 2016
Children with disabilities 72.19% 2016
English learners 78.14% 2016
Race – Hispanic/Latino 83.46% 2016
Race – American Indian 84.91% 2016
Race – Asian 90.68 % 2016
Race – Black or African American 76.77% 2016
Race – Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 88.24% 2016
Race – White 87.29% 2016

The measurements of progress are based on increases in the percentage of all students in Maine who make progress toward the long-term goals on a three-year basis. Long-term goals were developed to reduce the percentage of non-graduating students to result in student groups all meeting the goal of 90% by 2030. The calculation process, for example, is as follows:

Subgroup: All Students

  • Step 1: 2016 Graduation Rate = 86.83%
  • Step 2: 90% (goal) – 86.83% (baseline) = 3.17%
  • Step 3: Differential for each 3-year step is 3.17 divided by 5 = .61%
  • Step 4: Add to the baseline .61 % and add the .61% to each subsequent step to reach the goal of 90% by 2030.

Goals for extended- year cohort graduation rate

Subgroup Baseline (Data and Year) Long-term Goal (Data and Year) 2030
All students 88.61% 2016 92% or maintain current 2016, whichever is greater, graduation percentages by 2030
Economically disadvantaged students 80.82% 2016
Children with disabilities 77.27% 2016
English learners 86.12% 2016
Asian 94.27% 2016
American Indian 83.49% 2016
Black 83.47% 2016
Hispanic 84.13% 2016
Native Hawaiian 93.33% 2016
White 88.84% 2016
Multiple Races 86.62% 2016

Graduation rate will be presented on the initial page of the report card in the following way:

reportcard1

reportcard2

reportcard3

reportcard4

For further information please contact Janette Kirk, Acting Director, Office of Learning Systems at Janette.Kirk@maine.gov.

WIDA Early Years Online Learning Modules (to Support Multilingual Children) Now Available at No Cost to Teachers and Administrators

The Maine Department of Education is excited to announce that Maine’s early care and education community is now able to access to the WIDA Early Years online learning modules. These modules focus on supporting young multilingual children, ages 2.5 to 5.5 years and are available at no cost to teachers and administrators. Multilingual children, commonly referred to as dual language learners, are children who are developing more than one language.

Each self-paced, interactive module provides opportunities for reflection and offers suggestions for applying content to local practice. The following modules are available:

  • Dual Language Learners and their Families
  • WIDA Early English Language Development Standards Framework
  • Dual Language Learners with Disabilities
  • Scaffolding Language Learning
  • Promising Practices

A description of each module, frequently asked questions, and instructions for creating a user account and registering for the modules can be found in the documents listed below:

Access the modules: WIDA Early Years online modules (visit and create your user account)

If you are a program leader, administrator, trainer, or coach, we hope you will utilize these modules as a resource to support the professional learning needs of those serving multilingual children. The modules can be used in staff development sessions and/or shared with individual educators or teams of educators, such as professional learning communities.

Contact hours are available upon completion of a module. To receive a contact hours certificate, please download the certificate of completion generated by the WIDA Early Years online system and email it to april.perkins@maine.gov.

Additionally, the Department has purchased a set of WIDA Early Years Promising Practices Implementation Kits to assist districts in refining their programs for young multilingual children. These kits serve as a program self-evaluation tool, highlighting several evidence-based, highly effective strategies for supporting children’s development of multiple languages. Several districts with a significant number of dual language learners will receive these kits. A district that does not receive its own kit may request to borrow one from the Maine Department of Education.

WIDA Early Years resources have been provided to Maine educators through Title III, CDS, Head Start and public pre-k funds.

If you have any questions about these resources, or to request to borrow a WIDA Early Years Promising Practices Implementation Kit, please contact Maine DOE Director of ESOL/Bilingual Programs & Title III April Perkins at april.perkins@maine.gov or (207)624-6627.