Maine DOE Seeks Proposals for 21st Century Community Learning Center Programs

The Maine Department of Education is pleased to announce the release of a request for proposals (RFP) seeking bids from interested parties to implement comprehensive 21st Century Community Learning Center (21st CCLC) programs in 2019-2020.  It is anticipated that an estimated $1.75M will be available to issue grant awards later this year.

21st Century Community Learning Center Programs RFP (PDF)

Authorized under Title IV, Part B of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Act of 2015, the 21st CCLC program provides competitive grant funding to support before school, after school, and summer learning programs that focus on improving the academic performance of students in Pre-Kindergarten through grade 12.

The primary purpose of Maine’s 21st CCLC program is to provide school and community partnerships with funding to establish or expand programs that provide students in high-need, economically-disadvantaged communities with academic enrichment opportunities designed to complement their traditional school day curriculum.  In addition, these programs can provide a broad array of additional support services related to overall student health and well-being.

Local 21st CCLC programs – which can be located in elementary schools, secondary schools or similarly accessible community facilities – provide high quality support services to students during non-school hours.  As such, these programs also support working parents and families by providing safe, supportive learning environments for students at times when school is not in session.

The request for proposal (RFP), which includes information regarding eligibility, program requirements, and more, is available here. An informational webinar for this RFP will be posted to the Department’s application website on January 17, 2018.  It is strongly encouraged that interested parties view this presentation prior to completing an application for 21st CCLC program funding.

Below is the anticipated timeline for the Department’s 2019 21st CCLC grant competition:

Date Task
January 8, 2019 Grant Application Released to Public
January 17, 2019 Informational Webinar Posted Online
January 31, 2019 Deadline for Submission of Questions in Response to RFP
February 14, 2019 Interested Parties Submit Letter of Intent to Apply
April 4, 2019 Application Deadline
April 2019 – May 2019 Peer Review of Applications
May 2019 Grant Award Notifications
July 1, 2019 Grant Award Start Date

Please be advised that the dates above are subject to change. Interested parties must consult the RFP document for the most accurate dates and deadlines regarding this opportunity.

For more information on the 21st Century Community Learning Center (21st CCLC) Program, contact Federal Grant Coordinator, Travis Doughty, at travis.w.doughty@maine.gov.

McKinney Vento Sub-grant for the Education of Homeless Students

The Maine DOE congratulates the Bangor School Department for being conditionally awarded a $40,000 McKinney Vento sub-grant for the education of homeless students.  Through a focused needs assessment, Bangor discovered that their homeless students need help catching up to their peers in language arts, math, and high school credit accrual.  Bangor has committed to using the grant award in part to reduce school social worker caseloads, enabling them to coordinate more regularly with guidance staff, monitor and support students’ academic success, and focus on meeting identified needs of homeless students and families.

Maine DOE annually receives approximately $200,000 in federal McKinney Vento sub-grant funds to distribute statewide to supplement annual homeless education resources, such as Title IA funds. Maine DOE remains committed to distributing the unawarded sub-grant funds across the state so that they are broadly available to address statewide concerns and documented local needs.  A new RFP will be issued in early 2019 for the remaining funds. Districts who were not awarded a grant in this round are encouraged to apply.

If you have questions about homeless education or the McKinney Vento sub-grant program, contact Gayle Erdheim, gayle.erdheim@maine.gov or (207) 624-6637.

 

Recording & Materials from Presentation About ESSA & Report Cards

The Maine Department of Education held a presentation on Monday, December 10 about the details of Maine’s Model of School Support under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) which includes the release of the new, user-friendly, public Report Cards in early January. Below is a link to a recording of the session and links to the PowerPoint Presentation, in addition to all of the handouts from the presentation.

Further questions about Maine’s ESSA Plan, Maine’s Model of School Support, and the Report Cards should be directed to Acting Director of Learning Systems, Janette Kirk Janette.Kirk@maine.gov or ESEA Federal Programs & School Turnaround Director Chelsey Fortin-Trimble Chelsey.A.Fortin@maine.gov.

What Does Accountability Mean for a School?

Maine’s Model of School Support includes five indicators that focus on key areas of school and student success, adhere to the requirements of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), and directly align to Maine’s Priorities and Goals. Below is the list of indicators of school success:

  1. Chronic Absenteeism (K-12)
  2. Academic Progress (Grades 3-8 Only)
  3. Progress in English Language Proficiency (ELP) for English Learners (K-12)
  4. Academic Achievement (Grades 3-8, High School)
  5. Graduation Rate (High School Only)

Eligible individual student populations (where there are ten or more students of a specific student population) are also measured to identify where targeted support is needed. Student populations include: economically disadvantaged, students with disabilities, English learners, and students who are white, black, Asian, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander, Native American, Hispanic, or two or more races.

To determine each school’s performance on the indicators listed above, Maine uses data collected from public schools on an annual basis to provide each school with a performance rating on each applicable indicator.

School Indicators & Performance Levels

The chart below summarizes the indicators used in Maine’s Model of School Support for Maine’s public elementary, middle, and/or high schools. In addition, the criteria surrounding the performance levels for each indicator has been provided.

Indicators Performance Level
Emerging Developing Meeting Excelling
Chronic Absenteeism All eligible student group populations have a chronic absenteeism rate of 10% or higher. At least one eligible student group has a chronic absenteeism rate of less than 10%. All eligible student groups have a chronic absenteeism rate of less than 10%. All eligible student groups have a chronic absenteeism rate of 5% or less.
Academic Progress – English Language Arts All eligible student groups have score of less than 100. At least one eligible student group has a score of at least 100. All eligible student groups have a score of at least 100. All eligible student groups have a score of at least 150.
Academic Progress – Math All eligible student groups have a score of less than 100. At least one eligible student group has a score of at least 100. A scores of at least 100 for all eligible student group A scores of at least 150 for all eligible student group
Progress in English Language Proficiency  The average progress towards the student’s annual target is less than 65% The average progress towards the student’s annual target is between 65% and 80% The average progress towards the student’s annual target is between 80% and 95% The average progress towards the student’s annual target is greater than 95%
Academic Achievement – Math All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual target All eligible student groups made their annual targets All eligible student groups exceeded their annual targets by at least 10%
Academic Achievement – English Language Arts All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual target All eligible student groups made their annual targets All eligible student groups exceeded their annual targets by at least 10%
Graduation Rate – 4YR All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual graduation target All eligible student groups made their annual graduation targets All eligible student groups have met or exceeded the long-term goal of 90%
Graduation Rate – 5/6YR All eligible student groups did not make annual targets At least one eligible student group made its annual graduation target All eligible student groups made their annual graduation targets All eligible student groups have met or exceeded the long-term goal of 92%

Based on student population performance within the school, each school will achieve performance level for each indicator that is applicable to the grade span (elementary/middle or high school). An example of performance levels for indicators is provided below:

report card

A school’s performance in the above indicators will determine the level of support available to the school.

tiers of supportTiers of Support

Maine has developed three Tiers of Support designed to direct various levels of assistance from the Maine DOE.

Tier III supports are designated specifically for schools experiencing the most significant challenges across all eligible student groups, and who also receive Title I funding.

Tiers I and II are designed to support both Title I and non-Title I schools.

Support levels are determined based on eligible student groups (individual student populations with at least ten [10] students). Tier III supports are determined based on the performance of all eligible student groups while Tiers I and II are based on individual student groups. Student populations with fewer than 10 students are not included as part of the indicators for the school, this is consistent with federal FERPA regulations.

Below is a detailed summary that describes how a school’s level of support is determined, and the various supports that are available at each Tier.

Tier I
Additional Targeted Supports and Intervention
Tier II
Targeted Supports and Intervention
Tier III
Comprehensive Supports and Intervention
Any school with one or more eligible student group/s not meeting state expectations across all indicators in one or more content areas Any school with one or more eligible student group/s not meeting state expectations in the same indicator for three (3) consecutive years Schools that receive Title I funding and where all eligible student groups are not meeting state expectations in all indicators in one or more content areas.
Professional development will be available regionally and statewide at no cost. With access to a regional school leadership coach, schools will be responsible for developing and implementing a school level plan, in partnership with stakeholders, to include at least one evidence-based intervention.   Professional development will be available at no cost and driven by the needs of school staff and students. Tier II supports will be available during the 2019-2020 school year. With the support of a school leadership coach, schools will be responsible for developing and implementing a school level plan, in partnership with stakeholders, to include at least one evidence-based intervention. Schools will also have access to additional federal funds to support the implementation of a school leadership team and a school plan. Professional development will be available at no cost and driven by the needs of school staff and students.

Example scenarios demonstrating how a school is identified to receive support will be provided in the next room article.

Further questions should be directed to Janette Kirk, Acting Director, Office of Learning Systems at janette.kirk@maine.gov.

What Is Progress in English Language Proficiency? #success4ME

Maine defines English language proficiency (ELP) as sufficient skill in English necessary to meaningfully access the curriculum. As part of Maine’s Model of School Support, part of Maine’s rollout of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), this indicator of school success focuses on English learners and measures the progress they make toward English language proficiency each school year. ESSA requires that each state include an indicator that gauges, “progress in achieving English language proficiency as defined by the State and measured by the assessments within a State-determined timeline for all English learners.”

What does this look like in Maine?

English learners are students who have a primary or home language other than English and are in the process of learning English. Around 3% of Maine’s students are English learners and their schools support them in learning English to succeed academically. They may receive English language support services inside or outside of their regular classes, through programs specifically for English language development, or through a variety of other supports. It usually takes 4-7 years for an English learner to become proficient in English, but this can vary depending on many factors.

Each year, English learners are administered ACCESS for ELLs, an assessment that measures a student’s ability to listen, speak, read, and write in English. A student’s overall score ranges from 1.0-6.0. In Maine, English language proficiency is defined as level 4.5, so the progress in English language proficiency indicator measures how much progress a student makes each year toward reaching level 4.5. A school’s score for progress in English language proficiency is based on the average percentage made towards the annual target for each student, where there are at least ten (10) English learners.

School level descriptors for progress in ELP is as follows:

Emerging Developing Meeting Excelling
The average progress towards the students’ annual target is less than 65% The average progress towards the students’ annual target is between 65% and 80% The average progress towards the students’ annual target is between 80% and 95% The average progress towards the students’ annual target is greater than 95%

How progress in ELP will be presented on the report card:

ELPreportcard1.png

In the example provided below, there are less than 5 students who are English learners and therefore the data has been suppressed (notated by a *).

ELPreportcard2

ELPreportcard3